Including Original "Paul H. Letters" Copyright © 1996-2017 Paul V. Heinrich - All rights reserved.



Monday, 18 December 2006

100, 000 to 200, 000 BP Western Desert of Egypt Impact

100, 000 to 200, 000 BP Western Desert of Egypt Impact

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Mon Dec 18 09:58:49 EST 2006

Dear Friends,

A paper about a proposed Pleistocene impact in the
western Desert of Egypt is in press in the Earth and
Planetary Science Letters.

It is:

Osinski, G. R., H. P. Schwarcz, J. R. Smith, M. R.
Kleindienst, A. F.C. Haldemann and C. S. Churcher.
in Press, Evidence for a 200-100 ka meteorite impact
in the Western Desert of Egypt. Earth and Planetary
Science Letters. available online December 2006

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0012821X

This paper argues that unusual silicate glasses found
near the Dakhleh Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt is the
result of either a "cratering event or a large aerial burst",
which occurred about 100,000 to 200,000 year ago
according to Ar/Ar dating and geoarcaheological
evidence.

Some web pages:

1. Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt
http://epsc.wustl.edu/~kieniewicz/dakhleh_oasis.htm

2. Excavations at Mut el-Kharab, Dakhleh Oasis
http://arts.monash.edu.au/archaeology/excavations/dakhleh/index.html
http://arts.monash.edu.au/archaeology/excavations/dakhleh/mut-el-kharab/index.html

3. Haldemann, A. F. C., M. R. Kleindienst, C. S.
Churcher, J. R. Smith, H. Schwarcz, K. Markham, and
G. Osinski, 2005, Mapping Impact Modified Sediments:
Subtle Remote-Sensing Signatures of the Dakhleh
Oasis Catastrophic Event, Western Desert, Egypt.
American Astronomical Society, DPS meeting #37, #17.03;
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, Vol. 37, p.648

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005DPS....37.1703H

Yours,

Paul H.


Tuesday, 28 November 2006

New Papers About Permian Mass Extinctions

New Papers About Permian Mass Extinctions

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Nov 28 13:25:21 EST 2006

Dear Friends,

Two recent papers, which are coauthored by Dr. Greg J.
Retallack and discuss the Permian mass extinction, have
been recently published.

They are:

Retallack, G.J. and Krull, E.S. 2006. Carbon isotopic evidence
for terminal-Permian methane outbursts and their role in
extinctions of animals, plants, coral reefs and peat swamps.
In Greb, S. and DiMichele, W.A., Editors, Wetlands through
time. Special Paper of the Geological Society of America.
vol 399, p 249-268.

The 3 MB version of the above paper can be downloaded from:

http://www.uoregon.edu/~gregr/Papers/Ragnarok2.pdf

This paper provides a very detailed discussion of what he and
his coauthors argued caused the Permian mass extinction.

Also, there is:

Retallack, G.J., Greaver, T., Jahren, A.H., Smith, R.M.H.,
Sheldon, N.D., and Metzger, C.A., 2006, Middle-Late
Permian mass extinction on land. Geological Society of
America Bulletin. vol. 118, p. 1398–1411.

The 1.5 MB version of the above paper can be downloaded from:

http://www.uoregon.edu/~gregr/Papers/Mid-Late%20Permian%20extinction.pdf

The above Geological Society of America Bulletin paper is
interesting because, they recognize two distinct and separate
geologically abrupt mass extinctions on land. One of these
occurs at the end of the Middle Permian (Guadalupian) at
260.4 Ma and a later one occurring with the Permian Period
at 251 Ma. Both of these correspond to previously recognized
marine mass extinctions. He is quite skeptical of the Permian
mass extinctions as having been related to any asteroid or
comet impact.

Other papers coauthored by Greg J. Retallack, which are
related to the Permian extinction can be found at:

http://www.uoregon.edu/~gregr/publications.html

They include:

Retallack, G.J., Jahren, A.H., Sheldon, N.D., Chakrabarti, R.,
Metzger, C.A., and Smith, R.M.H., 2005. Permian-Triassic
boundary in Antarctica. Antarctic Science 17, 241-258.

The PDF file for this paper can be found at:

http://www.uoregon.edu/~gregr/Papers/PTAntarctica.pdf

Yours,

Paul

Friday, 13 October 2006

Stalking the Wily Shattercone

Stalking the Wily Shattercone

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Oct 13 14:05:35 EDT 2006

While browsing the Internet, I came across a paper, which provides
a very nice summary of the different criteria, which can be use to
authenticate a impact structure.

The paper is:

French, B. M., 2005, Stalking the Wily Shattercone: A Critical Guide for
Impact-Crater Hunters. Impacts in the Field. vol. 2 (Winter), pp. 3-10.

The Winter 2005 issue of "Impacts in the Field", which contains this
article can be downloaded from

http://web.eps.utk.edu/ifsg_files/newsletter/Winter_2005.pdf

links to other issues of "Impacts in the Field" can be found at:

http://web.eps.utk.edu/ifsg.htm

Best Regards,

Paul H.

Monday, 9 October 2006

Re: Egypt's Craters Pose Geological Riddle

Re: Egypt's Craters Pose Geological Riddle

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Mon Oct 9 14:10:02 EDT 2006

In “Egypt's Craters Pose Geological Riddle”, Ron
Baalke wrote:


> http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2006/10/06/crater_pla.html?category=travel&guid=20061006103030



> Egypt's Craters Pose Geological Riddle, Larry O'Hanlon

> Discovery News October 6, 2006


There are a number of links, which provided more detail
about this ongoing controversy. They are:

1. Remarks to the origin of the craters around Gilf
Kebir and Djebel Uweinat (Egypt)and the supposed
impact craters of Libya by Norbert Brugge, Germany,
2004, at

http://hometown.aol.de/SLVehicles4/Clayton%20Craters/Clayton-Craters.htm

2. di Martino, and others, 2006, Non-Impact Origin of
the Crater Field in the Gilf Kebir Region (SW Egypt).
European Space Agency First International Conference on
Impact Cratering in the Solar System ESTEC, Noordwijk,
The Netherlands, 08 - 12 May, 2006. The abstract can
be found at:

http://www.rssd.esa.int/SYS/docs/ll_transfers/296053_dimartino.pdf

and 3. The actual presentation of the above paper can
be found at

Non-impact origin of the crater field in the Gilf
Kebir region (SW Egypt) by M. Di Martino, L. Orti,
L. Matassoni, M. Morelli, R. Serra, and A. Buzzigoli.

The 3.3 MB PDF can be found file at:

http://www.rssd.esa.int/SYS/docs/ll_transfers/296053_Di2DMartino_pres.pdf

and in “40th ESLAB First International Conference on Impact
Cratering in the Solar System Agenda, Monday 8 May 2006 at:

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=39029

On page 25 of the above PDF file, Di Martino and coauthors
dispute the impact origin of what has been called the “Kebira
crater” in Libya - Egypt.

Yours,

Paul H.

Tuesday, 26 September 2006

Kilmichael Structure, Mississippi, Revisited

Kilmichael Structure, Mississippi, Revisited

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Sep 26 21:23:49 EDT 2006

Tomorrow afternoon, David T. King of the Department of Geology,
Auburn University, Auburn, AL will talk recent research conducted
on the Kilmichael Structure, Mississippi, at this weeks Gulf Coast
Assicaition of Geological Societies 2006 Annual Meeting in
Lafayette, louisiana. The paper accompanying this talk is;

King, D. T., Jr., and L. W. Petruny, 2006, Cosmic impact in the coastal
plain of Mississippi? The Kilmichael structure. Gulf Coast Association
of Geological Societies Transactions, vol. 56, pp. 341-351.

Its abstract states:

"The Kilmichael structure, a probable impact crater in Montgomery
County, Mississippi, is a circular, structurally disturbed feature
possessing a diameter of approximately 5.6 mi. A refraction seismic
survey reveals subsurface characteristics of an impact structure,
including a central uplift, annular graben, and concentric inward-
dipping faults. A gravity profile like that of some confirmed impact
craters is present. In a key core hole at the structure’s center,
770 ft of section, consisting mainly of breccias and large intact
blocks, was penetrated and sampled. In this paper, we have
reinterpreted the sequence of drilled strata as follows (in reverse
stratigraphic order): (1) soil and colluvium; (2) post-impact
laminated marine sediments; (3) conglomeratic aqueouswashback
or resurge deposits of mixed provenance; (4) interbedded impact
breccias and target rock blocks, i.e., surgeback deposits; (5) large,
deformed and rotated blocks of the Upper Cretaceous Ripley
Formation; and (6) interbedded impact breccias and target rock
blocks, mainly Upper Cretaceous chalks. The stratigraphic age
of this structure is probably late early to early late Paleocene,
based on the fossil age of material from the youngest
recognizable intact block drilled in the key core hole. The
Kilmichael area was in a marginal marine to shallow marine setting
at the time of deformation and the drilled stratigraphy is consistent
with aqueous or “wet-target” impact."

Yours,

Paul

Thursday, 7 September 2006

Eltanin Impact Area - A Few References - was "Eltanin - Part 2 of 2 "

Eltanin Impact Area - A Few References - was "Eltanin - Part 2 of 2 "

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Thu Sep 7 09:52:05 EDT 2006

In the post "Eltanin - Part 2 of 2", bernd.pauli wrote:

"Bostwick J.A. et al. (1995) Asteroid sample return
mission II: Eltanin recovered (abs. Meteoritics 30, 490)"

A few of a number of other papers about the Eltanin
Impact Area are:

Kyte1, F. T., 2001, Chapter 9, Data Report: A Search
for Deposits of the Late Pliocene Impact of the Eltanin
Asteroid in Rise Sediments from the Antarctic Peninsula,
Site 1069. In Barker, P. F., Camerlenghi, A., Acton,
G. D., and Ramsay, A. T. S., eds., Proceedings of the
Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results. vol. 178

http://www-odp.tamu.edu/publications/178_SR/VOLUME/CHAPTERS/SR178_09.PDF

Kyte1, F. T., R. Gersonde, and G. Kuhn, 2005, Detailed
Results on the Analyses of the Eltanin Impact, Recovered
in Sediments Cores from Polarstern expedition
ANT-XVIII/5A. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI (2005)

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2005/pdf/2129.pdf

Gersonde, R., and F. T. Kyte, 2001, Exploration of the
Eltanin Impact Area (Bellingshausen Sea): Expedition ANT
XVIII5a 64th Annual Meteoritical Society Meeting.

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/metsoc2001/pdf/5421.pdf

Gersonde, R., F. T. Kyte, U. Bleil, B. Diekmann, J. A.
Flores, K. Gohlk, G. Grahl, R. Hagen, G. Kuhn, F. J. Sierro,
D. Volker, A. Abelmann, and J .A. Bostwick, 1997, Geological
record and reconstruction of the late Plioceneimpact of
the Eltanin asteroid in the Southern Ocean. Nature.
vol. 390, pp. 357-363.

Gersonde1, R., F. T. Kyte, T. Frederichs, U. Bleil, and
G. Kuhn, 2003, New Data on the Late Pliocene Eltanin
Impact into the Deep Southern Ocean. Large Meteorite
Impacts 2003.

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/largeimpacts2003/pdf/4094.pdf
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/largeimpacts2003/pdf/sess06.pdf

Shuvalov, V. V., 2003, Numerical Modeling of the Eltanin
Impact. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXIV.

+++++ Volume 49, Number 6 (2002) of Deep Sea Research
Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography +++++

This issue contains the following papers

1. Calcareous plankton stratigraphy around the Pliocene
"Eltanin" asteroid impact area (SE Pacific): documentation
and application for geological and paleoceanographic
reconstruction by J. A. Flores, F. J. Sierro, and R.
Gersonde, pp. 1011-1027.

2. Composition of impact melt debris from the Eltanin
impact strewn field, Bellingshausen Sea by F. T. Kyte,
pp. 1029-1047.

3. Iridium concentrations and abundances of meteoritic
ejecta from the Eltanin impact in sediment cores from
Polarstern expedition ANT XII/4 by F. T. Kyte,
pp. 1049-1061.

4. Unmelted meteoritic debris collected from Eltanin
ejecta in Polarstern cores from expedition ANT XII/4 by
F. T. Kyte, pp. 1063-1071.

5. Impact tsunami-Eltanin by S. N. Ward and E. Asphaug,
pp. 1073-1079(7)

+++++ Bathymetric Maps of the Eltanin Impact Area +++++

AWI Bathymetry & Geodesy - Eltanin Impact Survey: Analyses
of High Resolution Bathymetric Data in the Eltanin Impact
Area by Merijn J. Jacops at:

http://www.awi-bremerhaven.de/GEO/Bathymetry/eltanin/eltanin.html

The maps of the Eltanin Impact Area consist of:

1. Eltanin Impact Area at 57°25'00'' overview map, 1:200.000
- 4.0 MB PDF file available at;

http://www.awi-bremerhaven.de/GEO/Bathymetry/eltanin/eltanin_overview.pdf

2. Bathymetric chart Eltanin Impact Area northwest, 1:100.000,
sheet 1 - 2.6 MB Pdf file available at;

http://www.awi-bremerhaven.de/GEO/Bathymetry/eltanin/eltanin_1a.pdf

3. Bathymetric chart Eltanin Impact Area northeast, 1:100.000,
sheet 2 - 3.1 MB Pdf file available at;

http://www.awi-bremerhaven.de/GEO/Bathymetry/eltanin/eltanin_2a.pdf

4. Bathymetric chart Eltanin Impact Area southwest, 1:100.000,
sheet 3 - 5.7 MB Pdf file available at;

http://www.awi-bremerhaven.de/GEO/Bathymetry/eltanin/eltanin_3a.pdf

5. Bathymetric chart Eltanin Impact Area southeast, 1:100.000,
sheet 4 - 4.7 MB Pdf file available at;

http://www.awi-bremerhaven.de/GEO/Bathymetry/eltanin/eltanin_4a.pdf

Yours,

Paul

Monday, 4 September 2006

Re: Geological History of terrestrial "Olivine Bomb"?

Re: Geological History of terrestrial "Olivine Bomb"?

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Mon Sep 4 19:39:16 EDT 2006

Gerald Flaherty wrote:

"I picked up an Olivine Bomb from Norbert and
Helke Kammel of "Rocks On Fire" a couple of
years ago when I knew less than I know now of
meteorites. It's Location is listed as Mt.
Shadwell, Victoria, Australia. At the time the
very word "olivine" immediately brought pallasite
to mind. I think I'd just invested in my first
Imilac. This piece is tantalizing in every way,
from is thick jet black volcanic crust, to its
beautifully polished green interior. Is this
terrestrial mantle tossed up in a violent
volcanic blast? Are these common?"

Technically speaking, they are not volcanic bombs, which are
thrown out of volcanoes during eruptions. Rather, they are
exotic chunks of rocks, called xenoliths, carried upward by
magma as it ascended through the crust. The best preserved
xenoliths are those carried up rapidly from deep in the
mantle by the formation of diatremes.

Mount Shadwell is the highest of a cluster of basaltic scoria
cones. It is well known as a source of olivine and augite
ultramafic xenoliths and clinopryoxene and orthoclase
megacrysts contained in basalts and scoria. My understanding
that although such xenoliths can be found in many basaltic
lavas, the ones found at Mount Shadwell are uncommon for
their size and preservation. The xenoliths found at Mt.
Shadwell are inferred to have come from both the lower
crust and upper mantle.

Some web pages:

1. Mount Shadwell - Victorian Resources Online
http://www.nre.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/coranregn.nsf/pages/eruption_points_shadwell

2. Coexisting Andesitic and Carbonate Melts in a
Lherzolite Xenolith from Mt. Shadwell, Victoria

http://www.es.mq.edu.au/geology/MNAGC98.html
http://www.es.mq.edu.au/geology/MNHP.html

3. Melting and Metasomatism in the Lithospheric Mantle Beneath
SE Australia: Trace Element Studies by Laser Microprobe by
Marc Norman and Suzanne O'Reilly

http://www.es.mq.edu.au/GEMOC/annrep97/abs96/Norm396.htm

4. Roach, I. C., 2004, Mineralogy, Textures and P-T
Relationships of a Suite of Xenoliths from the Monaro
Volcanic Province, New South Wales, Australia. Journal of
Petrology. vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 739-758.

http://petrology.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/45/4/739

5. Ellis. D. J., 1976, High pressure cognate inclusions
in the Newer Volcanics of Victoria. Contributions to
Mineralogy and Petrology. vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 149-180.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/r02x704tlm23w415/

6. Xenolith

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenolith

Yours,

Paul H.

Wednesday, 30 August 2006

Re: Discovery of a huge impact site in East Jordan

Re: Discovery of a huge impact site in East Jordan

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Aug 30 11:03:32 EDT 2006

drtanuki (Dirk) wrote:
“Stefan and List,
Thank you Stefan! That is virtually what I have.
The Google coordinates I have been studying for
almost three months are 31.025349N,36.482491E
measured at the centre of the crater. The diameter
that I get using the google measure is 5.8Km
for the outer ring. The central uplift I have not
measured.”

I was looking at the 1968 El Azraq Sheet for the 1:250, 000
scale “Geologische Karte von Jordanien” (Geological map
of Jordan), Deutsche Geologische Mission in Jordanien) :
Hanover, Federal Republic of Germany. This geologic map
clearly shows a very well defined circular uplift of
Cretaceous marls, bituminous limestones, cherts, dolomites,
and so forth surrounded by Eocene to Paleocene cherty
limestones, marls, and nummulitic limestones at the precise
center of the proposed East Jordan impact site. In addition,
the same map shows a quite well developed ring of faults,
which completely and almost perfectly surrounding the
circular uplift of Cretaceous strata within the Paleogene
carbonates. As shown in this map, this feature certainly
looks like an impact structure. I guess in the late 1960’s,
geologists had not yet started thinking in terms of impact
structures.

Paul H.

Online Guidebook for the Middlesboro Impact Crater

Online Guidebook for the Middlesboro Impact Crater

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Aug 30 09:59:26 EDT 2006

A field trip guidebook to the Middlesboro impact
crater can be downloaded from the Kentucky
Geological Survey "Field Trips" web page at:

http://www.kspg.org/pages/fieldtrips.html

The guide to the Middlesboro impact crater is part
of "Geologic Impacts on the History and Development
of Middlesboro, Kentucky. Year 2003 Annual Field
Conference of the KSPG". The 5.3MB PDF file can be
downloaded from:

http://www.kspg.org/pdf/03fieldguide.pdf

The "Field Guide to the Middlesboro Impact
Structure and Beyond by Keith A. Milam and
Kenneth W. Kuehn can be found on pages 30-44
of the above guidebook. This impact crater
is also discussed in "Mining and Construction
Obstacles in the Middlesboro Basin, Kentucky
by Stephen F. Greb, pp. 17-22, and An
Introduction to Impact Cratering by Keith A.
Milam, pp. 23-29 of "Geologic Impacts on the
History and Development of Middlesboro,
Kentucky”.

Yours,

Paul H.

Missouri Impact Craters Guidebooks Now Online as PDF Files

Missouri Impact Craters Guidebooks Now Online as PDF Files

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Aug 30 09:37:43 EDT 2006

The field trips guidebooks for the May 21-23, 2005
conference, The Sedimentary Record of Meteorite
Impacts in Springfield, Missouri can be downloaded
as PDF files online. The two guidebooks are:

Field Trip 1: Geology of the Weaubleau-Osceola
Structure, Southwestern Missouri, Sunday, May 22,
2005 by Kevin R. Evans, James F. Miller, and
George H. Davis

and Field Trip 2: Geology of the Decaturville and
Crooked Creek Structures, Southern Missouri,
Monday, May 23, 2005 by Patrick S. Mulvany, Kevin
R. Evans, and George H. Davis.

They can downloaded as a single 2.6 MB PDF file from:

http://geosciences.missouristate.edu/geology/SEPMRC/SEPMRC_guidebook.pdf

The link to this guidebook is "Download the Field Trips
Guidebook (pdf)”, which is found on the “SEPM Research
Conference, The Sedimentary Record of Meteorite
Impacts” web page at:

http://geosciences.missouristate.edu/geology/SEPMRC/conference.html

Another guidebook to the geology of the Weaubleau-
Osceola Structure is;

Evans, Kevin R.; Mickus, Kevin L.; & Rovey, Charles
W. III, 2003, The Weaubleau Structure: Evidence of
a Mississippian Meteorite Impact in Southwestern
Missouri. Association of Missouri Geologists Field
Trip Guidebook, 50th Annual Meeting. Missouri
Department of Natural Resources.

This 3.8 MB PDF file of this guidebook can be
downloaded from:

http://geosciences.missouristate.edu/geology/RI-75(2003AMGguidebook).pdf

The link to this PDF file can be found in "RECENT
FIELD TRIPS" web page as "Guidebook Published by
Missouri Geological Survey for the 2002 Meeting of
the Association of Missouri Geologists (PDF*)" at;

http://geosciences.missouristate.edu/Fieldtrips.htm

A link to web pages showing images of the Ries impact
crater are also found on the same web page. The URL
for this web page is:

http://geosciences.missouristate.edu/geology/FieldTrips/Ries/default.html

Best Regards,

Paul H.

Tuesday, 29 August 2006

Wethersfield Meteorites was "Question"

Wethersfield Meteorites was "Question"

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Aug 29 10:11:50 EDT 2006

Michael L Blood asked:

"In 1971 a meteorite struck a hous in
Wethersfield,Conn. As if that weren't
enough, ANOTHER meteorite struck
another house in that small town in 1982!
I'm stoked. However, I have NEVER
seen either of these falls available for
sale. Has ANYONE on the list seen either/
both of these falls available for sale?
Anyone have any?"

The main mass of the 1982 fall is in the Peabody
Museum of Natural History as noted in The Wethersfield
Meteorite, Meteorites and Planetary Science, Peabody
Museum of Natural History at:

http://www.yale.edu/peabody/collections/met/index.html

There was only 52 grams of fragments, which broke off of
the 2.756 kg main mass. I suspect that these were consumed
in the studies of the meteorite mentioned in the above
article.

The 1971 meteorite is owned by the Division of Meteorites
of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. From what I
found, there was only a main mass of 350 grams, which the
Smithsonian now has.

Yours,

Paul H.

Wednesday, 12 July 2006

Martian Sedimentary Meteorites

Martian Sedimentary Meteorites

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Jul 12 23:14:27 EDT 2006

Ashley, Gail M. and Delaney, Jeremy S, 1999, If a meteorite of
Martian sandstone hit you on the head would you recognize it?
1999, Lunar and Planetary Science XXX, abstarct no. 1273

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/LPSC99/pdf/1273.pdf

Tuesday, 4 July 2006

Metal Detectors was " Even more of that darned Brenham"

Metal Detectors was " Even more of that darned Brenham"

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Jul 4 16:09:50 EDT 2006

Mr. Garrison wrote:


>A rotted/"puzzle piece" new main mass? Photo on site

> http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/14956160.htm


What type of metal detector would a person use to look for
buried, badly rusted meteorites??

How does a person calibrate it to sense pieces of meteorite
somehwat smaller than found above?

Are there any web pages on using metal detectors to look
for buried meteorites?

Yours,

Paul

Friday, 30 June 2006

Old Italian Lithograph of Japanese Fall

Old Italian Lithograph of Japanese Fall

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Jun 30 17:12:57 EDT 2006

Metorman46 at aol.com wrote:


>Jeff; I have to wonder about the report of a tsunami

>associated with this March 16 fall.If the report is true

>and or verified by research in japan that would be

>amazing.To generate a tsunami the bolide had to

>strike the sea,as you know.Japan was in a state of

>limbo at this time in history after the II world war

>and being occupied by allied forces.News about a

>bolide probably wasn't spread around very much

>because of that situation.I would venture to

>guess that a local record exists somewhere that

>would shed more light on this event. Maybe

>someone in japan could research the matter.

>

>To me ,this is intrigueing and could lead somewhere

>or not if checked out.TSUNAMI,TSUNAMI.that is the

>key,i think. Interesting topic Jeff.


I checked with the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center. It
turns out that although there is no catalogue of Russian
tsunamis in Soviet times, the Japanese kept and still
keep a very detailed catalogue listing all of the
tsunamis that hit Japan each year. The Japanese kept
very exact and detailed records, even in 1947, of the
tsunamis, which hit their coasts. For example, they
found a record of a small tsunami that hit Japan on
November 4, 1947. It was associated with an
earthquake off the west coast of Hokkaido.

However, the Japanese catalogue lists nothing for either
February 12, 1947 or the months on either side of it. In
the japanese and other tsunamis catalogues, there
exist “orphan” tsunamis, whose source is unknown. If
you are looking for meteorite impact tsunamis, these
are the ones to be investigated ion some manner.

Best Regards,

Paul H.

Monday, 26 June 2006

Online Publication About Hypothesized Iraqi Impact Structure

Online Publication About Hypothesized Iraqi Impact Structure

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Mon Jun 26 12:25:09 EDT 2006

The PDF version of a publication on the hypothesized Iraqi Impact
Crater is available online. The paper is:

Master, S. and Woldai, T. (2004) The UMM Al Binni structure in the
Mesopotamian marshlands of Southern Iraq, as a postulated late
holocene meteorite impact crater : geological setting and new
LANDSAT ETM + and Aster satellite imagery. Johannesburg,
University of Witwatersrand, Economic Geology Research Institute
(EGRI), 2004. EGRI - HALL : information circular 382, 21 p.

It can be downloaded from a link at:

http://www.itc.nl/about_itc/resumes/woldai.aspx and

http://www.itc.nl/library/Academic_output/2004/Technical_report_2004.asp

The 2 MB PDF file of it can be downloaded directly from:

http://www.itc.nl/library/Papers_2004/tech_rep/woldai_umm.pdf

Yours,

Paul H.

Tuesday, 13 June 2006

Re: Does a Giant Crater Lie Beneach the Antarctic Ice?

Re: Does a Giant Crater Lie Beneach the Antarctic Ice?

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Jun 6 13:08:13 EDT 2006

On June 4, 2006, Ron Baalke quoted

http://www.nature.com/news/2006/060529/full/060529-11.html

Does a giant crater lie beneath the Antarctic ice?
Signs of an ancient impact could help to explain a mass
extinction. by Mark Peplow, nature.com,June 2, 2006"

In part, the article stated:

“An impact of that size should also have melted and
twisted nearby rock. Yet rocks in the Transantarctic
Mountains of the same age show no evidence of the
collision, says Jane Francis, a geologist also at the
University of Leeds. "That sequence has been worked
on before, and no one has found evidence to support
a massive impact like this," she says.”

This is an excellent point as there are complete stratigraphic
sections across the Permian-Triassic boundary exposed in
the Transantarctic Mountains and undisputed impact ejecta
and other evidence of a nearby impact of such a size is
completely lacking. The reports of shocked quartz from
these outcrops have been retracted and the reports of helium-
filled fullerenes, meteorite fragments, and other impact-
related debris are highly disputed. A full description of the
Permian-Triassic boundary and a discussion of the impact
ejecta reported from it can be found in:

Collinson, J. W., Hammer, W. R., Askin, R. A., and Elliot,
D. E., 2006, Permian-Triassic boundary in the central
Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica. Geological Society
of America Bulletin. vol. 118, no. 5, pp. 747–763.
doi: 10.1130/B25739.1

http://www.gsajournals.org/gsaonline/?request=get-abstract&doi=10.1130%2FB25739.1

Yours,

Paul

Saturday, 10 June 2006

Free Online Topographic Maps of Various Countries

Free Online Topographic Maps of Various Countries

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sat Jun 10 01:44:05 EDT 2006

Scanned images of Russian topographic maps (at scales from 1:10,000 to
1:5,000,000, but mostly 1:100,000 and 1:200,000) of a wide variety of
countries, including Africa, Albania, Liybia, China, Australia, Greece, India,
Indonesia, and so forth are available free of charge at:

http://mapy.mk.cvut.cz/data/

Yours,

Paul

Thursday, 25 May 2006

Football-Size Rock Crashes Through Roof and Lodges in Wall in Nevada

Football-Size Rock Crashes Through Roof and Lodges in Wall in Nevada

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Thu May 25 13:19:50 EDT 2006

'A LOT OF FORCE': Mystery object hits center
Substance to be sent to UNLV for analysis
By K.C. HOWARD, REVIEW-JOURNAL, Las Vegas
http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2006/May-24-Wed-2006/news/7572899.html

"On Saturday night, an unidentified object was sent hurtling
through the roof at Steven Gleicher's workplace.

Was the football-sized object a meteor or perhaps something
more common?

And perhaps just as puzzling: How could it rip through a thick pane
of fiberglass strong enough to hold a human being and then embed
itself into a wall?

"It could just be a large piece of asphalt because it is grey on the
outside and black in the middle," said Gleicher, an administrator
at Diagnostic Imaging Southern Nevada, at 3560 E. Flamingo Road,
near Pecos Road."

..... rest of article deleted....

Wednesday, 17 May 2006

Scientists Look to Moon for Signs of Early Earth Life

Scientists Look to Moon for Signs of Early Earth Life

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed May 17 14:33:49 EDT 2006

Scientists Look to Moon for Signs of Early Earth Life by Robert Krulwich
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5410577

"Morning Edition, May 17, 2006 · The first life on earth would
have left traces in our planet's infant rocks. But those early
layers have since been squeezed and heated out of all
recognition. Some researchers say we should look for
evidence of the earliest life on earth in rocks on the moon."

Wednesday, 10 May 2006

Meteorite Fragment Found in Morokweng Crater Impact Melt

Meteorite Fragment Found in Morokweng Crater Impact Melt

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed May 10 17:23:59 EDT 2006

Maier, W. D., M. A. G. Andreoli, I. McDonald, M. D. Higgins, A. J. Boyce, A.
Shukolyukov, G. W. Lugmair, L. D. Ashwal, P. Graser, E. M. Ripley, and R. J.
Hart, 2006, Discovery of a 25-cm asteroid clast in the giant Morokweng
impact crater, South Africa. Nature. vol. 441, no. 4751, pp. 203-206.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v441/n7090/abs/nature04751.html

Fragment of an LL6 chondrite breccia found impact melt of 70 km
diameter crater in South Africa.

Information about the Morokweng Impact Crater can be found at:

http://www.unb.ca/passc/ImpactDatabase/images/morokweng.htm

Saturday, 6 May 2006

Middle Stone Age Impact Identified in Western Desert, Egypt

Middle Stone Age Impact Identified in Western Desert, Egypt

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sat May 6 21:44:25 EDT 2006

Some archeologists and geologists have published research about
a Middle Stone Age meteorite impact, which occurred in the Western
Desert of Egypt.

Haldemann, A.F.C., M.R. Kleindienst, C.S. Churcher, J.R. Smith, H.P.
Schwarcz, K. Markham, and G. Osinski, 2005, [17.03] Mapping
Impact Modified Sediments: Subtle Remote-Sensing Signatures of
the Dakhleh Oasis Catastrophic Event, Western Desert, Egypt.
Session 17 Dust, Impacts and Earth Atmosphere, 37th AAS Division
for Planetary Sciences Meeting, 31st AAS Historical Astronomy
Division Meeting and the Royal Astronomical Society, 4-9
September 2005, University of Cambridge, UK.

http://www.aas.org/publications/baas/v37n3/dps2005/427.htm

"Ca-Al rich glass (Dakhleh Glass) points to a catastrophic event
between c. 100,000 - 200,000 years ago in this well-studied
African savannah and freshwater lake, Middle Stone Age
environment."

++++

A.F.C. Haldemann, M.R. Kleindienst, C.S. Churcher, J.R. Smith,
H.P. Schwarcz, and G. Osinski, 2005, Volatiles in the Desert:
Subtle Remote-Sensing Signatures of the Dakhleh Oasis
Catastrophic Event, Western Desert, Egypt. Role of Volatiles
and Atmospheres on Martian Impact Craters 2005 Meeting, Lunar
and Planetary Institute, Houston, Texas.

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/volatiles2005/pdf/3038.pdf

++++

Haldemann, A. F. C., M. R. Kleindienst, C. S. Churcher, J. R. Smith,
H. P. Schwarcz and G. R. Osinski, 2005, Mapping impact modified
sediments: subtle remote-sensing signatures of the Dakhleh Oasis
Catastrophic Event, Western Desert, Egypt. The Sedimentary
Record of Meteorite ImpactsMeeting , Society for Sedimentary
Geology, Springfield, Missouri.

http://geosciences.missouristate.edu/geology/SEPMRC/SEPMRC_program.pdf

"Bracketing by archaeological remains confirms the chronometric
date obtained on the glass of 122,000 ± 40,000 yrs for the
heating event--during the Middle Stone Age occupations of the
oasis area"

Paul H.

Friday, 5 May 2006

Google Earth (Map) Question was "New Impact Structures"

Google Earth (Map) Question was "New Impact Structures"

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri May 5 14:35:19 EDT 2006

Jeff Kuyken wrote:

"Or click here for a pic for those of you without Google Earth, etc"

When using Google Earth or Google Maps, is there some
way of finding out what the metadata, i.e. source, date, kind,
resolution, etc., of the imagery for the area being viewed?

Best regards,

Paul

Tuesday, 18 April 2006

A Couple of Online Articles About Australian Tektites

A Couple of Online Articles About Australian Tektites

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Apr 18 13:36:25 EDT 2006

Dear List Members,

While browsing the Internet, I came across a couple
of articles, which are available online as PDF
documents, which might be of interest to people on
this list.

One of them is:

Pillans, Brad, 2004, Tektites as Chronostratigraphic
Markers in Australian Regolith. In I. Roach, ed.,
pp. 279-281, Proceedings of the CRC LEME Regional
Regolith Symposia, November 2004, Adelaide, Perth
and Canberra.

Apparently, Dr. Pillans, as a part of his research is
looking for tektites, which have detailed information
concerning where they were found. The article stated:

“As part of the CRC LEME geochronology
project I would like to hear from anyone
who has found tektites. I also encourage
all of you to be alert to tektites in
your field work.”

He definitely encourages people to make detailed notes
on location and the context of any tektites, which they
find, much like is done now for meteorites.

This article can be found at:

http://leme.anu.edu.au/Pubs/Monographs/regolith2004/Pillans_b.pdf

The source of this article is:

http://leme.anu.edu.au/Pubs/Monographs/Regolith2004.html

http://crcleme.org.au/Pubs/Monographs/regolith2004/a_abstract%20volume%20front.pdf

Another paper, which discusses tektites, is:

Brad Pillans, 2004, Geochronology of the Australian
Regolith, (c) CRC LEME 2004 Geochronology

This article can be found at:

http://crcleme.org.au/RegLandEvol/Geochron_of_%20Aust_Regolith.pdf

Another online paper, which mentions tektites, is:

Pillans, B., 2003, Subdividing the Pleistocene using
the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary (MBB): an Australasian
perspective. Quaternary Science Reviews. vol. 22,
pp. 1569-1577.

It can be found at:

http://www.quaternary.stratigraphy.org.uk/noticeboard/pillans.pdf

A list of his publications can fopund at:

http://wwwrses.anu.edu.au/environment/eePages/eePeople/eeBradPillans.html

Best Regards,

Paul


Monday, 17 April 2006

Searching for Information on "Mahuika Crater" (New Zealand) and Any Associated Tektites

Searching for Information on "Mahuika Crater" (New Zealand) and Any Associated Tektites

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Mon Apr 17 15:55:54 EDT 2006

Dear Listmembers,

I am looking for information, including citations for any
published papers, about the age and origin of what has
been called the "Mahuika Crater", which is located off
of the coast of New Zealand. Also, have tektites actually
been found associated with it?

Best Regards,

Paul
Louisiana

Wednesday, 12 April 2006

New Paper on Bedout High, Australia, in EPSL

New Paper on Bedout High, Australia, in EPSL

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Apr 12 17:16:00 EDT 2006

There is a paper about a geophysical study of the Bedout High,
one porposed site for a end of Permain imapct, just off of the
nothwest corner of Australia.

Muller, R. D., A. Goncharov, and A. Kritski, 2006, Geophysical
evaluation of the enigmatic Bedout basement high, offshore
northwestern Australia. Earth and Planetary Science Letters.
vol. 237. pp. 264–284.

They concluded:

"The available geophysical and geological data are compatible
with an interpretation of the Bedout structure as a basement
high formed by two consecutive Paleozoic and Mesozoic
episodes of rifting roughly orthogonal to each other, associated
with basin formation east and west of the Bedout High, but
fail nearly all unequivocal criteria for impact crater recognition."

Sunday, 2 April 2006

Columbian Impact Structure (??) and Deccan Basalts was “Multiple Impact and 73P

Columbian Impact Structure (??) and Deccan Basalts was “Multiple Impact and 73P

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sat Apr 1 12:05:42 EST 2006

In “Multiple Impact and 73P(was..More Evidence
Chicxulub..)”, MexicoDoug at aol.com wrote


>Sterling W. writes:

<< Keller-Harting get lots of press, but nobody
<>

>

>Hola Sterling,

>

>The idea that multiple impacts ocurred doesn't

>seem to far fetched, and we can basically thank

>them for introducing it as potentially more viable

>and consistent based on top-notch fieldwork, not

>just astronomical mullings.”


Columbian Impact Structure ??

This discussion reminded me a geologic structure, which
was found in seismic surveys made for oil and gas
exploration, lying beneath the Columbian continental
shelf. It was a huge, possibly larger than Chicxulub,
circular stucture, which was a candidate for the K/T
impact site, until it was found. Once Chicxulub was
found and published, it seems to have been completely
forgotten. Does anyone know if anything had ever been
published on it? Might this still be an alternate possibility
for the K/T killer?

The Deccan Flood Basalts, An Additional Complication

To further complicate the K/T boundary controversy,
there are these findings and interpretations:

India’s Smoking Gun: Dino-Killing Eruptions
Geological Society of America Press Release, 9
August 2005

http://www.geosociety.org/news/pr/05-27.htm

The abstract stated:

“In fact, most mass extinctions over the past 300 million
years have coincided with large volcanic events, said
Chenet. The general rule is that massive volcanism
like the Deccan Traps correlates with all major mass
extinctions in Earth's history, she said.”

Another article is “Volcanic prepping for dinosaur
extinction” from the October 2005 Geotimes at:

http://www.agiweb.org/geotimes/oct05/NN_volcextinction.html

The abstract discussed in the above articles is:

Chenet, A.-L. Courtillot, V., Fluteau, F., Besse, J.,
Subbarao, K. V., Khadri, S., Bajpai, S., and Jay, A., 2005,
Magnetostratigraphy of the Upper Formations of the
Deccan Traps: an Constraint on the Timing of the
Eruptive Sequence. Session no. T9. Large Igneous
Provinces: Their Biotic, Climatic, and Oceanic Impact,
Earth System Processes 2 Meeting, August 8-11, 2005.
Calgary, Alberta.

http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2005ESP/finalprogram/abstract_88502.htm

I find it fascinating that there seems to exist a far better
correlation between eruption of massive flood basalts
and mass extinctions than there is between impact
events and mass extinctions. This is discussed in an
interesting abstract:

Courtillot, V., and Thordarson, T., 2005, Flood basalts
appear to be the main cause of biological mass
extinctions in the Phanerozoic. Geophysical Research
Abstracts, Vol. 7, 11196, 2005
SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU05-A-11196

http://meetings.copernicus.org/egu2005/download/EGU05-J-11196-1.pdf

The who, what, and when of the K/T extinction event is
far from a settled matter.

Best

Paul

Thursday, 30 March 2006

Part2: Professor Rejects Meteor Theory of Carolina Bays' Origin

Part2: Professor Rejects Meteor Theory of Carolina Bays' Origin

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 29 14:53:22 EST 2006

Susan Web wrote:

“Their key mysterious features are their
number (half a million of them), their
regularity of form, their common
orientation, their extreme shallowness,
their low rim heights.”

Their “common orientation” is not as consistent as the
proponents of an impact origin falsely claim them to be.
In the southern and northern ends of their distribution,
the long axis of Carolina Bays actually show a wide
range of orientations, which fails to support either an
air-burst or impact origin. Within the middle range of
their distribution, the orientation of the Carolina Bays
are consistent with Pleistocene paleowind directions as
determined from ancient dune fields, loess distribution
patterns, and paleoclimate models. I would find it quite
remarkable that either a meteorite or comet would take
the time and trouble to plan its impact as to perfectly
coincide with the prevailing winds at the time it hit like
an airplane landing at an airport. The wide spread of
orientations at the northern and southern ends of their
distributions is also consistent with what is known about
the variability of Pleistocene paleowind patterns over
time.

Another and major problem, which the proponents of either
an impact or air-burst origin is that the shape, orientation,
and depth of the Carolina Bays have been altered by over
a 100,000 years of modification by eolian and lacustrine
processes. For example, Ivester et al. (2003) found that
the multiple sand rims found within Big Bay in South
Carolina become progressively younger towards the center
of this Carolina Bay. In this case, Optically Stimulated
Luminescence (OSL) dates from sand rims starting from
the outer rim to the inner rim produced a perfectly
chronologically consistent set dates of 35,660±2600;
25,210±1900; 11,160±900; and 2,150±300 years BP. In
this case, the Big Bay has shrunk by 1.6 km over the last
36,000 years, with rims being produced about 36,000 BP,
25,000 BP, 11,000 BP, and 2,000 BP as it shrunk. If a
person wants to argue that these sand rims are of impact or
air-burst origin, they need to explain how either impacts or
air-bursts managed to precisely excavate tens of thousand
of years apart sucessive craters in precise center of Big Bay
and similar Carolina Bays and with ever decreasing energy
as to produce sand rims of smaller and smaller diameter,
which are nicely nested within each other.

Their nothing mysterious about these rims as (Ivester et al.
2004a) studied the sedimentology and stratigraphy of these
rims and found them to be “composed of both shoreface
and eolian deposits". Eolian and lacustrine processes are
perfectly capable of producing the low rims processes by
Carolina Bays. The low rims can be easily explained by a
combination of eolian and lacustrine processes.

As a result of the OSL dating of the rims of numerous Carolina
Bays, Ivester et al (2004b) concluded:

"The optical dating results indicate that
present-day bay morphology is not the
result of a single event, catastrophic
formation, but rather they have evolved
through multiple phases of activity and
inactivity over tens of thousands of years.
This is evidenced both by multiple rims
of differing ages along the same bay, and
by multiple ages within single rims."

Because the Carolina Bays have been modified for over a
100,000 years by both eolian and lacustine processes, their
form, orientation, shallowness, and sand rims are useless as
evidence of how they were originally created.

References Cited:

Ivester, A.H., Godfrey-Smith, D. I., Brooks, M. J., and
Taylor, B. E., 2003, Concentric sand rims document the
evolution of a Carolina bay in the Middle Coastal Plain
of South Carolina. Geological Society of America
Abstracts with Programs. vol. 35, no. 6, pp. 169.

Ivester, A. H., Godfrey-Smith, D. I., Brooks, M. J., and
Taylor B. E., 2004a, The timing of Carolina Bay and
inland activity on the Atlantic coastal plain of Georgia
and South Carolina. Geological Society of America
Abstracts with Programs. vol. 36, no. 5, p. 69

Ivester, A. H., Godfrey-Smith, D. I., Brooks, M. J., and
Taylor B. E., 2004b, Chronology of Carolina bay sand
rims and inland dunes on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA.
The 3rd New World Luminescence Dating Workshop. July
4 - 7, 2004, Department of Earth Science, Dalhousie
University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Mrs. Webb also wrote:

“It is also worth noting that all the
geological theories of their origins
are based on the erroneous notion
that the Carolina Bays are all to be
found in only one type of geological
terrain, the coastal plains. But they
have since been found in other terrain
types, which effectively rules out
most of the prior geological theories
(except for those fish fins, of course).”

Unfortunately, the only “erroneous notion” here is the
pervasive Internet folklore about Carolina Bays having
been found on a variety of geologic terrains. The fact
of the matter is that Carolina Bays are **not** found in
a diverse assortment geologic terrains. The Internet
fiction about Carolina Bays being found in a wide range
of geologic terrains was soundly refuted by the detailed
analysis, which May and Warme (1999) did of Carolina
Bays, including those found within the coastal plains of
Mississippi and Alabama. They found that these bays
are restricted to deeply weathered, very low relief, and
very poorly drained, geomorphic surfaces.

Reference Cited:

May, James H., and Warne, Andrews G., 1999, Hydrogeologic
and Chemical Factors Required for the Development of
Carolina Bays Along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Coastal
Plain, USA. Environmental Engineering and Geoscience.
vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 261-270.

The abstract for May and Warme (1999) can be found at:

http://eeg.geoscienceworld.org/cgi/content/abstract/5/3/261

Best,

Paul

Re: Professor Rejects Meteor Theory of Carolina Bays' Origin

Re: Professor Rejects Meteor Theory of Carolina Bays' Origin

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 29 10:29:52 EST 2006

Thaddeus Besedin wrote:

“Is it known if any metals associated with and
transported by meteorites have been detected
in any substantive concentrations in cores or
other samples?

Ron Baalke wrote:

http://www.thetandd.com/articles/2006/03/28/news/doc4428a99f752a6396001544.txt

No. There has not been any convincing association between
iridium or any related elements, meteorites, and the Carolina
Bays. Some of the data concerning the age of the Carolina
Bays and papers on their origin is noted in a popular article at:

http://www.hallofmaat.com/modules.php?name=Articles&file=article&sid=86

Some interesting web pages:

Abstracts by Ivester and others:

http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2002AM/finalprogram/abstract_45547.htm
http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2004AM/finalprogram/abstract_78899.htm

Luminescence dating of Carolina Bay sand rims

http://www.westga.edu/~aivester/pr01.htm

Paul

Monday, 20 March 2006

Discussion On Whether Chicxulub Impact Killed the Dinosaurs or Not

Discussion On Whether Chicxulub Impact Killed the Dinosaurs or Not

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sun Mar 19 23:31:59 EST 2006

Chicxulub discussion page

Welcome to the Chicxulub discussion page

This page contains discussion related to Keller, Adatte &
Stinnesbeck's article, The Non-Smoking Gun.
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/template.cfm?name=NSG2349857238495
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/template.cfm?name=NSG1
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/template.cfm?name=NSG93854738475347
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/template.cfm?name=NSG999999

RE: Article on paleo-Bolide porduced tsunamites/seismites

RE: Article on paleo-Bolide produced tsunamites/seismites

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sun Mar 19 23:30:29 EST 2006

jonee (Elton) asked:

"Anyone have a link as to specifically what tsunamites
and seismites are defined as?"

There is a definition of "tsunamite" in:

Shanmugam, G., 2006, The Tsunamite Problem. Journal
of Sedimentary Research. vol. 76. DOI: 10.2110/jsr.2006.073

http://www.colorado.edu/geolsci/jsedr/Abstracts/may2006/ShanmugamAbs.pdf
http://www.colorado.edu/geolsci/jsedr/Abstracts/may2006/jsr76-5.html

The above abstract stated:

"The genetic term tsunamite is used for a potpourri
of deposits formed from a wide range of processes
(overwash surges, backwash flows, oscillatory flows,
combined flows, soft-sediment deformation, slides,
slumps, debris flows, and turbidity currents) related
to tsunamis in lacustrine, coastal, shallow-marine,
and deep-marine environments."

Although they are called "Tsunami Sand Deposits", pictures
of coastal plain "tsunamites" created by the December Indian
Ocean Tsunami can be seen in:

"The December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami: Initial
Findings on Tsunami Sand Deposits, Damage, and
Inundation in Sri Lanka" at:

http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/tsunami/srilanka05/tsunami_sand_deposit.html
http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/tsunami/srilanka05/sand.html

and in "Tsunami deposits (figure 3: thickness of the deposits)" at:

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/raphael.paris/tsunami.htm

Another coastal tsunami deposit (tsunamite) from the
1929 Grand Banks Earthquake found at Taylor's Bay on
Newfoundland's southern coast can be seen at:

http://www.seismo.nrcan.gc.ca/damage/1929/1929tuttleresearch.php

A definition of "seismite" can be found in "Developing a Classification
Scheme for Seismites" by Stephen F. Greb at:

http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2002NC/finalprogram/abstract_32750.htm

This abstract for the 2002 North-Central Section (36th) and
Southeastern Section (51st), Geological Society of America Joint
Annual Meeting stated:

"The term "seismite" is presently used for many features and
deposits of inferred seismic origin, each of which requires
varying types and amounts of data to support a seismic
interpretation."

One type of seismite is sediment that show disturbance /
deformation, while it was still soft, caused by the ground
shaking, which accompanies an earthquake. Some pictures
of seismites can be found in "The Late Triassic seismite
in Northern Ireland, southwest England and south Wales" at:

http://www.habitas.org.uk/larne/assortedseismites.html

A related article might be:

Walkden, G., J. Parker, and S. Kelley, 2002, A Late Triassic
Impact Ejecta Layer in Southwestern Britain. Science. vol. 298,
no. 5601, pp. 2185-2188. DOI: 10.1126/science.1076249
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/298/5601/2185

The Entrada Sandstone contains soft sediment deformation
features, which are argued to be impact-related seismites.
This is discussed in:

Alvarez, W., E. Staley, D. O'Connor, and M. A. Chan, 1998,
Synsedimentary deformation in the Jurassic of southeastern
Utah: A case of impact shaking? Geology. vol. 26, no. 7,
pp. 579-582.

http://eps.berkeley.edu/~platetec/125.pdf

a press release can be found at:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981006073850.htm

Best

Paul

Saturday, 18 March 2006

Astronomers Map Earliest Evidence of Big Bang

Astronomers Map Earliest Evidence of Big Bang

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Mar 17 19:52:43 EST 2006

New Three Year Results on the Oldest Light in the Universe
http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_or/PressRelease_03_06.html
and http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm.html

Microwave map of the sky can be found at:
http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_ig/060917/CMB_ILC_PolMap150bk.png

Time Line of the Universe
http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_ig/060915/CMB_Timeline150.jpg

Other articles:

New Satellite Data On Universe's First Trillionth Second
Science Daily, Johns Hopkins University, March 17, 2006
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060316181253.htm

Astronomers Find the Earliest Signs Yet of a Violent Baby Universe
By DENNIS OVERBYE, New York Times, March 17, 2006
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/17/science/space/17cosmos.html

New Images Support 'Big Bang' Theory
Washington Post, by Guy Gugliotta, March 17, 2006
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/16/AR2006031601889.html
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/16/AR2006031601889_pf.html

Re: Large Impact Crater Off the Coast of Antarctica

Re: Large Impact Crater Off the Coast of Antarctica

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Mar 17 17:05:41 EST 2006

Ron Baalke wrote:

"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4816794.stm
Space impact clue in Antarctica By Paul Rincon
BBC News, March 17, 2006"

A couple of relevant published papers are:

Published papers on this alleged crater are:

Hrjanina, L. P., 1998, Once Again about Kainozoic Meteorite Structures
in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Lunar and Planetary Science XXIX,
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/LPSC98/pdf/1152.pdf

Gerard-Little, P., D. Abbott, D. Breger, and L. Burckle, 2006, Evidence
for a Possible Late Pliocene Impact in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Lunar
and Planetary Science XXXVII.
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2006/pdf/1399.pdf

Another paper is:

Khryanina, L. P.,1985, Possible meteorite impact structures in the
Ross Sea, Antarctica. International Geology Review. vol. 27, no. 10,
pp.1207-1211.

Yours,

Paul

Thursday, 16 March 2006

RE: Desert Varnish formation

RE: Desert Varnish formation

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 15 17:09:53 EST 2006

Kevin Forbes wrote:

“Desert Varnish formation
http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ploct97.htm”

A couple of related references are:

Quade, Jay, 2001: Desert pavements and associated
rock varnish in the Mojave Desert: How old can they
be?. Geology. vol. 29, no. 9, pp. 855–858.

and

Broecker, W. S., and Liu. T., 2001: Rock Varnish:
Recorder of Desert Wetness?. GSA Today. vol. 11,
no. 8, pp. 4–10.
doi: 10.1130/1052-5173(2001)011<0004:rvrodw>2.0.CO;2

The PDF version of Broecker and Liu (2001) can
be downloaded from:

http://www.gsajournals.org/pdfserv/10.1130%2F1052-5173(2001)011%3C0004:RVRODW%3E2.0.CO%3B2

http://www.gsajournals.org/gsaonline/?request=get-abstract&doi=10.1130%2F1052-5173(2001)011%3C0004:RVRODW%3E2.0.CO%3B2

Reassembly of the above URLs might be needed. If you do not paste
the full URLs into your browser, a message incorrectly stating that
you will need to buy the GSA Today article will appear.

Best Regards,

Paul

How to Discover Asteroid Impacts

How to Discover Asteroid Impacts

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 15 17:06:20 EST 2006

How to discover asteroid impacts
The story of the discovery of two impact craters
By Emilio González, March 13, 2006
http://www.astroseti.org/impacts.php

Wednesday, 15 March 2006

RE: Desert Varnish formation

RE: Desert Varnish formation

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Mar 14 10:34:13 EST 2006

Kevin Forbes wrote:

“Desert Varnish formation
http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ploct97.htm”

A couple of related references are:

Quade, Jay, 2001: Desert pavements and associated
rock varnish in the Mojave Desert: How old can they
be?. Geology. vol. 29, no. 9, pp. 855–858.

and

Broecker, W. S., and Liu. T., 2001: Rock Varnish:
Recorder of Desert Wetness?. GSA Today. vol. 11,
no. 8, pp. 4–10.
doi: 10.1130/1052-5173(2001)011<0004:rvrodw>2.0.CO;2

The PDF version of Broecker and Liu (2001) can
be downloaded from:

http://www.gsajournals.org/pdfserv/10.1130%2F1052-5173(2001)011%3C0004:RVRODW%3E2.0.CO%3B2

http://www.gsajournals.org/gsaonline/?request=get-abstract&doi=10.1130%2F1052-5173(2001)011%3C0004:RVRODW%3E2.0.CO%3B2

Reassembly of the above URLs might be needed.

Best Regards,

Paul

Wednesday, 8 March 2006

Strange Newspaper Headline About Meteorites

Strange Newspaper Headline About Meteorites

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 8 14:30:22 EST 2006

Dear Friends,

Jay Leno's Tonight Show showed a headline about meteorites,
which you-all might appreciate. It can be seen at:

http://www.nbc.com/nbc/The_Tonight_Show_with_Jay_Leno/headlines/H_3095/26.shtml#headline

Yours,

Paul

Wednesday, 22 February 2006

Smithsonian Tektite Publciation on Ebay (AD?)

Smithsonian Tektite Publciation on Ebay (Add??)

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Feb 22 12:25:55 EST 2006

Dear Friends,

While surfing through Ebay, I noticed a tektite publication for sale,
which might be of interest to someone on this list. It is:

Occurence, Distribution, and Age of Australian Tektites,
Smithsonian Contributions to the Earth Sciences no.17 (1976)

It can be found in "3 SI Earth Sciences Bks Australian Tektites CANADA",
Item number: 4614410243 (Ends Feb-23-06 18:47:17 PST) at;

http://cgi.ebay.com/3-SI-Earth-Sciences-Bks-Australian-Tektites-CANADA_W0QQitemZ4614410243QQcategoryZ378QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

This is not my add. Also, I have no idea, who the person selling
this item is. Thus, you bid on this item at your own risk.

Although I have no use for this paper myself, it seems like a significant
enough publication that it deserves a good home with someone, who is
interested in teltites.

Best Regards,

Paul

Friday, 6 January 2006

Did "Red Rain" Dump Alien Microbes on Earth ??

Did "Red Rain" Dump Alien Microbes on Earth ??

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Jan 6 16:57:40 EST 2006

The below article appeared while "Googling" for meteorites.
All sorts of wierd and unexplained stuff seems to fall from
they sky every so often.

Skepticism greets claim of possible alien microbes
Jan. 5, 2006, Special to World Science
http://www.world-science.net/exclusives/060104_specksfrm.htm

"A paper to appear in a scientific journal claims a strange
red rain might have dumped microbes from space onto
Earth four years ago.

But the report is meeting with a shower of skepticism
from scientists who say extraordinary claims require
extraordinary proof—and this one hasn’t got it."

+++++

Astrophysics, abstract
astro-ph/0601022

From: Godfrey Louis [view email]
Date: Mon, 2 Jan 2006 07:54:10 GMT (461kb)
The red rain phenomenon of Kerala and its possible
extraterrestrial origin.

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0601022

Have Fun,

Paul